Human Induced Regeneration Carbon Method

Human Induced Regeneration Carbon Method

The Human Induced Regeneration (HIR) method can be used by landholders who want to regenerate native vegetation on land where native forest is being suppressed and earn carbon credits. The Human Induced Regeneration method is being applied to Yallalong Station.

Projects under this method capture carbon by changing land management practices to facilitate regeneration of a native forest. Landholders can assist regeneration through activities such as excluding livestock from the project area, managing the timing and extent of grazing, managing feral animals and non-native plants in the project area, and stopping activities such as mechanical destruction of natural regrowth.

The method uses the Full Carbon Accounting Model (FullCAM) to work out the carbon captured by the project. Impacts of disturbances such as fires is also accounted for.

Projects are subject to permanence obligations. This means the project must be maintained for a nominated period of 25 years.

While the methodology and its application are complex, the key principles are easily explained. In summary, If an area:

  • has had grazing activities that has suppressed or reduced area of forest cover (Note: forest cover is defined as areas with trees that are 2 meters or more in height; and provide crown cover of at least 20% of the land),
  • has forest cover potential (where, having regard to the location and characteristics of the land, trees are reasonably likely to reach 2 metres or more in height; and provide crown cover of at least 20% of the land), and
  • has been destocked and/or managing the timing and extent of grazing on that land will allow areas of forest to regenerate.

For more information regarding this method visit the Clean Energy Regulator